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Emilio Longoria

Assistant Professor of Law

 

Education

  • J.D., University of Texas (with honors), 2017
  • B.A., Rice University, 2013

License to Practice

  • Texas

Specialties and Courses

  • Eminent Domain
  • Property Law
  • Land Use and Municipal Law
  • State and Local Government

Biography

Longoria is an Assistant Professor of Law at St. Mary’s University specializing in property law and land-use regulations. His research focuses on the intersection of the law and the built environment—with a particular interest in eminent domain disputes, public policy, and the emerging technologies and practices that are changing the shapes of cities.

Prior to joining St. Mary’s University, he worked in the Texas Legislature, taught at Cristo Rey Jesuit College Preparatory, and practiced law in Houston with Norton, Rose, Fulbright LLP and Marrs, Ellis and Hodge LLP. Longoria also clerked for United States District Court Judge George C. Hanks, Jr. of the Southern District of Texas.

Longoria received a Bachelor of Arts in History from Rice University, and a Doctor of Jurisprudence with Honors from the University of Texas at Austin. He is admitted to practice in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, the Federal Court of Claims, Texas State Courts, and all four Federal District Courts in Texas.

Longoria is a member of the Texas Bar College, and he serves on the Board of Directors for the Galveston County Bar Association, the Editorial Board of the Houston Lawyer Magazine, and the Historical Committee of the Houston Bar Association. Longoria is also an advisory member of the Texas Pattern Jury Charge Committee, which focuses on oil and gas law.

Honors and Awards

    • Induction, Texas Bar College, 2020
  • Legislative Award, Combined Law Enforcement Associations of Texas, 2013

Publications

Articles in a Periodical

  • Lech’s Mess with the Tenth Circuit: Why Governmental Entities are not Exempt from Paying Just Compensation When They Destroy Property Pursuant to their Police Powers, 11 Wake Forest Journal of Law & Policy 297 (2021).
  • The Case for the Rodeo: An Analysis of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo’s Inverse Condemnation Case Against the City of Houston, 52 St. Mary’s Law Journal 125 (2020).
  • Invisible, But Not Transparent: An Analysis of the Data Privacy Issues That Could Be Implicated by the Widespread Use of Connected Vehicles, 28 Albany Law Journal of Science and Technology 1 (2017).

 

Shorter Works in Collections

  • “Informality in South Texas: Understanding the Evolution of Colonias in El Cenizo and Rio Bravo,” in Informality and the City – Theories, Actions, Interventions (Gregory Marinic and Pablo Merinato eds., forthcoming 2022).